Annonce
University Post
University of Copenhagen
Independent of management

Ph.d.-forsvar

Molecular mechanisms in exercise and recovery

Ph.d.-forsvar — Christian Strini Carl is defending his PhD thesis Molecular mechanisms in exercise and recovery In vivo network characterization of the multi-modal exercise phosphoproteome and the mechanisms regulating post-exercise insulin sensitivity in human skeletal muscle

Info

Date & Time:

Place:
Aud. 1, August Krogh Building, Universitetsparken 13, 2100 København

Hosted by:
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen

Cost:
Free

Opponents
Associate professor Anke Ninija Karabanov (chair), Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Professor Anna Krook, Dept of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Associate professor Bert Blaauw, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Padova, Italy.

Supervisor
Professor Bente Kiens, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Co-supervisor
Professor Erik Richter, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

About the thesis
Exercise training can prevent and treat numerous chronic diseases including metabolic disorders, e.g., type II diabetes. However, the molecular signals inducing these health benefits are largely unknown.

By illuminating the global phosphorylation status of proteins in human skeletal muscle following endurance, sprint, and resistance exercise, this PhD project found a core set of phosphorylation sites regulated in all exercise modalities. Further, the role of the protein complex pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC), important for insulin sensitivity, was investigated in humans following exercise.

Using different human exercise models and state-of-the-art methods for measuring signal transduction and insulin sensitivity in vivo, this PhD project provides a greater understanding of proteins regulated with exercise and shows an important function of PDC in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake after exercise.

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